Archive | Testing RSS feed for this section

On filing bugs to Apple

26 Aug

Unlike other public bug tracking systems, Apple’s one is closed to public viewing other than Apple and the reporter of the bug.

So bugs you report, others can’t see the status of. And as such, there can be likelihood of duplicate bugs being filed, etc. I assume Apple has good reasons to overlook potential duplicate bugs in favor of this closed access bug tracking system.

Amusingly, a public repository of Apple bugs is available at OpenRadar. It’s useful for the public community to look for existing bugs filed to Apple before filing their own, and check status of said bugs. There is one caveat though, OpenRadar does not pull data from Apple’s system. Therefore to get data into OpenRadar, one must file a “duplicate” bug to it for whatever one files to Apple.

As such, I would recommend those of us who deal with Apple bugs to:

  1. Check OpenRadar first before filing bug to Apple. If one exists on OpenRadar, just subscribe to and monitor that. Although one is free to file a duplicate to Apple just in case.
  2. If one doesn’t exist on OpenRadar, then file bug to Apple. And if the bug is not specific to your internal case (confidential/security/proprietary info, intellectual property, etc.), post a duplicate filing on OpenRadar. This allows the public to see the bug you filed. Also makes it easier for team members to view the bug for those teams that don’t use a shared/team Apple developer account or whose said accounts aren’t all under the same organization access.
Advertisements

UI test automation of virtual app/browser delivery to local desktop

7 Jul

This thought just came to mind as I read through forum posts recently regarding automation scenarios like the following:

  • a web app or site is delivered to the user via a browser presented within a browser. e.g. via Citrix virtualization solutions delivered over a browser for desktop & browser-based apps.
  • a web or desktop app delivered to the user remotely via virtualization but made to feel as if it was installed, running, and deployed locally on the local machine, delivered via tools like MS Application Virtualization Client, Citrix, etc.

How do we test for these apps/cases, particularly say if we wanted to test against the exact deployment setup of how they are used? It would seem from the current infrastructure, this is likely a manual testing activity. And for automated testing, we are relegated to simplifying the test setup and assuming the simplified setup will behave the same as actual deployment, and just cover any differences with manual testing.

I bring this up as I know not of any existing automation solutions, commercial or free/open source, but particularly the latter, where these kinds of special deployment setups are supported for automation testing. As these deployments are delivered through virtualization technology, unless the test automation tools are integrated in that virtualization delivery (e.g. hosted and running in the same context as the app that’s delivered over virtualization rather than locally on the client receiving the virtualized app), the test tools won’t be able to detect and automate the virtual app. That integration is likely not feasible or easy to do due to platform isolation and security restrictions and sandboxing. It’s not quite the same as just running everything (the app under test & the automation tools) on a remote host and accessing it via remote desktop/VNC to see it in action.

Perhaps this isn’t much a concern for the community/industry until more and more people use this type of app delivery infrastructure where it is ubiquitous like mobile devices/apps are today. Still, something to ponder about for the future of testing. Wonder what is to come in this space for test automation. Or have I just been ignorant and we already have some tooling for this today?

iOS mobile testing tips

6 Jun

These tips may be found elsewhere on the web already, I’m just archiving this info I put together a while back into a single repository in the form of a blog post.

Tips for both iOS devices and iOS simulator

Firebug for iOS

Set up a javascript bookmarklet to Firebug Lite, so that you can invoke the lite version of Firebug in mobile Safari on actual device or simulator. See Martin Kool’s article for details, if you don’t know how to set up javascript bookmarklets. NOTE: on simulator, you will lose the bookmark when you do an iOS “Reset Content and Settings…” command. No issue on device unless you specifically delete bookmark or do a factory reset.

View Source of a page

iOS 8+: install an iOS 8 extension like the one called View Source. There are several extensions to choose from. The View Source one may be best as most popular, well known. Or you can also choose the other option for older iOS versions.

iOS 8+, 7.1, and earlier : use this Javascript bookmarklet trick/tip, or this version called Snoopy. NOTE: on simulator, you will lose the bookmark when you do an iOS “Reset Content and Settings…” command. No issue on device unless you specifically delete bookmark or do a factory reset.

Tips for iOS simulator

Set up camera roll to be able to use photos and videos for testing

See: How to import photos into the iPhone Simulator — Aptogo. In general, drag & drop photo into simulator and then tap & hold to save image in simulator will add to camera roll for later use. See the linked article if you need to bulk import photos into simulator. NOTE: on simulator, you may lose the photos when you do an iOS “Reset Content and Settings…” command. No issue on device unless you specifically delete photo or do a factory reset.

For videos, instead of photos, see How do I get video into the iPhone simulator camera roll in iOS 4.2? – Stack Overflow. NOTE: on simulator, you may lose the videos when you do an iOS “Reset Content and Settings…” command. No issue on device unless you specifically delete video or do a factory reset.

Tips for iOS devices

Debugging mobile and tablet websites on iOS – on Windows or locally on device

Tips on mobile and tablet device testing shared usage and remote testing outside corporate network

Sharing bookmarks and photos across devices

If you use an Apple/iCloud account across the devices (This might work on simulator iOS 7/7.1+ if you sign in to iCloud from simulator and then do a Debug > Trigger iCloud sync, although I haven’t tested it):

The photos on each device (if not existing photos, then new photos taken) will be accessible across devices via the Photo Stream section of Photos app. And deleting photo locally in camera roll of a device won’t delete it from the Photo Stream (for that device and all other shared iOS devices), so you have to specifically delete from Photo Stream to delete across devices, the camera roll is treated separately from Photo Stream on each device, so you will notice copies of what you have locally on camera roll also in the Photo Stream that’s available across devices. NOTE: that the Photo Stream (for iOS 6-7.x) is temporary storage, and to make it permanent on each device, you have to save it to local system (device/simulator) before it expires in 30 days (I forget, but the system may copy the photos you’ve previewed to your device after expiration rather than let it disappear from the stream). The iCloud Photo library in iOS 8 is different though with it being permanent storage.

Creating a bookmark on one device will automatically sync (if enabled, by default) them to the other devices using same account, so you don’t have to set up bookmarks/bookmarklets individually on each device.

Recording actions against or test session of iOS physical device into a video

For iOS 8+ only, but see Record your iOS Test Session with QuickTime | Daniel Knott

Tips for simulating iOS device in browser via user agents, etc.

Device screen sizes for testing mobile and tablet views of a site and user agent tools

Tips on mobile and tablet device testing, shared usage, and remote testing outside corporate network

6 Jun

Here’s some useful tips for development and QA testing of websites or apps on mobile/tablet devices, if you didn’t already know.

Tip on wireless network login (accounts) when sharing between people

This tip is for those who use a corporate wireless network that has user accounts per person without a common shared account (or guest access to internal resources).

Rather than ask the previous user for their network login password if/when prompted by the (iOS) device, here’s how to resolve that issue of sharing between users. The tip here is specific to iOS but should be similar for Android, Windows Phone, Windows, Mac, etc.

Option 1 – login with your own network login

You only need to do this if ever prompted to login with only a password (or prefilled username) rather than the whole username & password.

  1. Clear the cached user login info.
    1. Settings > Wi-Fi > find network (name), tap the wifi network’s settings/properties icon (a blue circled arrow on iOS 6, an “i” circled tooltip on iOS 7).
    2. Choose Forget this Network
  2. Find the network (name) again in wifi settings
  3. Select that network. You’ll now be prompted for the login username & password, and not just a password to cached login
  4. If you don’t like “your” login cached, then “forget” the network after using the device.

Option 2 – use other available network but then connect to internal network

This method won’t require you to keep swapping user logins when device shared between people. This only works if you have a wireless access for guests (that perhaps only grants access to internet and some internal resources but not all), or some public wireless access but not corporate wireless access.

  1. Connect to the guest or public wireless network
  2. Connect to internal network using VPN app on the mobile/tablet/device
  3. Disconnect VPN when done testing

Tips on remote testing at home or outside local network

When you’re at home or outside the local network, you don’t have access to internal resources. Here’s some options.

Option 1 – device VPN

Use VPN on the device to connect internally.

Option 2 – shared computer VPN

Use VPN on your computer and route network requests from device through a proxy server running on your computer, assuming both computer & device are on same network. This method allows you to share VPN from computer to device.

Tips on remote debugging of mobile, tablet devices

For Windows, see Debugging mobile and tablet websites on iOS – on Windows or locally on device

For Mac, search the web for iOS remote debugging for details.

Tips on HAR file capture on mobile/tablet devices

For iOS: https://github.com/andydavies/ios-har-builder

For Chrome mobile (Android)?: https://github.com/cyrus-and/chrome-har-capturer

Device screen sizes for testing mobile and tablet views of a site and user agent tools

6 Jun

These tips may be found elsewhere on the web already, I’m just archiving this info I put together a while back into a single repository in the form of a blog post.

Table quick reference for device screen sizes

Device Type Screen Size (width x height, in portrait view, landscape = swapped values)
Old iPhones up to iPhone 4S 320×480
iPhone 5 series 320×568
iPhone 6 375×667
iPhone 6+ 414×736
iPad (any model so far) 768×1024

 

Online references for these screen sizes:

CSS Media Queries for iPads & iPhones | Stephen Gilbert

http://www.emailonacid.com/blog/details/C4/adapt_your_media_queries_for_apples_new_iphone_6_and_6

css3 – iPhone 6 and 6 Plus Media Queries – Stack Overflow

Some desktop browser tools to assist with testing mobile and tablet views of a website (there are more you can lookup yourself)

User-Agent Switcher for Chrome – Chrome Web Store

Window Resizer – Chrome Web Store

User Agent Switcher :: Add-ons for Firefox

Firesizer :: Add-ons for Firefox

Safari has bulit in user agent switcher between iPhone, iPad, and normal Safari desktop. Not sure about resizing window to match user agent though.

Complex test scenario example to truly evaluate test frameworks?

6 Jun

This came to mind in a discussion I read a while back, so thought I’d mention it. Not sure if I already mentioned it or not. But the general way we evaluate test frameworks, is rather simple. Or supposedly our system/application is not so complex to test after all, at least in terms of interactions among different component types, which themselves need to be UI/functional/user acceptance tested. For example, these days, most systems to test involve a website front end and mobile app client front ends, both of which talk to a server back end. And the website and mobile app clients don’t often need testing where they interact with each other (or rather say you test something on one client and verify on the other for example). Instead we simply test them standalone, independent of each other (or maybe mock the other side). And/or we got lucky in that it happens that the different clients (web, mobile) happen to be able to use the same platform (e.g. Java, Selenium-API) so that we can use the same framework to test them.

But truly testing the capabilities of a test framework is when you have a complex scenario that involves multiple components that need to be tested in integration (whether you mock them or not), and for the sake of simplicity in this argument, let’s say if you had to mock them, you mock them in the same language as the original component (not mocking to the platform of the desired test framework, etc.). Thus in a truly complex scenario/world, you won’t be able to have all things in Java, .NET, or whatever.

One example showcasing testing a system that comprised of the following components would be ideal: a website or web application/client, an iOS mobile app client, an Android mobile app client, a desktop GUI client, a SIP/VoIP client, perhaps a terminal/console client talking to server back end, perhaps networking communication w/ server on backend (some type of TCP/IP or other network communication), REST API web services utilized by the web/mobile/desktop clients, some native Java/.NET/etc. APIs to call. And let’s assume each of these components are built with different technology stacks and/or the tools to test them (not the framework) use different technology stacks.

Such scenarios may void certain test frameworks out of the box, unless one doesn’t mind writing custom glue logic to bind the different testing (components, tools) together within the single test framework. But a few frameworks do have better support built-in that allow you to integrate different tech stacks and tools to the framework, granted it’s not necessarily plug & play, but it minimizes the amount of effort in glue logic to integrate. I’ll leave it as an open thought on what frameworks are useful for such complex scenarios and which aren’t so much.

What the f**k to test?

23 Feb

Was reading my emails and some blog posts today and came across these:

http://lifehacker.com/5911385/seven-helpful-sites-that-tell-you-what-the-fk-to-do

https://github.com/soulwire/WTFEngine

it made me think, as a tester, it would be interesting to have/see a site about “What the f**k to test” or something similar. It could be useful to the entry level and novice testers just getting into testing profession. And it could be useful to all of us testers when we happen to feel lazy or have “tester’s block” not being able to test or decide how/what to test.

Or do we actually have something like that already? If so, let me know.

If not, anyone interested in helping build such a site/service? It would be a site that randomly decides to give you the tester a tip on what to test for your site/application/system (in general terms that are not specific to your site/application/system).

Pete Zybrick

Bell Labs to Big Data

Seek Nuance

Python, technology, Seattle, careers, life, et cetera...

TELLURIUM

New Era of Test Automation

Der Flounder

Seldom updated, occasionally insightful.

The 4T - Trail, Tram, Trolley, Train

Exploring Portland with the 4T

Midnight Musings

Thoughts on making art

Automation Guide

The More You Learn The More You Play...!

The Performance Engineer

Code.Test.Tune.Optimize.

humblesoftwaredev

Thoughts related to software development

Yi Wang's Tech Notes

A blog ported from http://cxwangyi.blogspot.com

Appium Tutorial

Technical…..Practical…..Theoretically Interesting

LinuxMeerkat

I swear! Meerkats can do Linux

PacketsDropped

Requeuing the packets dropped in my memory.

Two cents of software value

Writing. Training. Consulting.

@akumar overflow

wisdom exceeding 140 chars.